Fury Fingers: Ghost Recon Wildtime

Fury Fingers are back with a new action comedy film based on ‘Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands’ – sanctioned and supported by Ubisoft.

Featuring wrestling, gun fights, fight choreography, car chases, drone filming, parkour and VFX, the film follows Iron, Atlas, Grimm and Beak are on a stealth mission in Bolivia (cleverly re-created in the South Australian outback), but party music, dead bodies, poor intel and general bad luck are ruining their chance of success…


Source: Fury Fingers on YouTube

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msausretrogamerMs. ausretrogamer
Co-founder, editor and writer at ausretrogamer – The Australian Retro Gamer E-Zine. Lover of science fiction, fashion, books, movies and TV. Player of games, old and new.

Follow Ms. ausretrogamer on Twitter

 

 

Lack of Order

‘Press X to Jason’ the screen reads, as you play through Heavy Rain. ‘Press X to pay respects’ the screen offers, as you begin Call of Duty Advanced Warfare’s campaign. These scripted moments are something that try and engage the gamer but often feel as though they are awkward moments, much like when a parent says to ‘Make sure you send grandma a thank you card for the $5 she gave you for your birthday!’ You sigh; “But, why?” is the silent question, grandma knows you love her, after all.

In games, being prompted to perform an action is something that is here to stay. Be it through a quick time event or something that is set to move the plot, being told how to play a game is a break of immersion that is unfortunately commonplace. To say that all prompts shouldn’t exist is completely foolish as well. In the Batman Arkham series, an enemy can be countered as the prompt flashes over their head. In the Metal Gear Solid series, stealth is achieved best by being aware of what the enemies are doing or how they are reacting to the player movements – if they are curious, we know, if they know we are there, we know. Past this, games that offer tips to playing the game, such as Uncharted, can be a welcome addition, prompting the player to look in a certain place, even with the prompted option of ‘Hint’ appearing on screen when a puzzle takes a player too long to crack.

source: The Turbulence

How then, did we get here? When we say that moving narrative through a button press may not be the best choice, what does the alternative look like? The answer I have found is in Minecraft. This argument is not built on Minecraft alone, but rather, the use of its crafting system and completely wonky puzzles. Do you want to build a pickaxe? Boards in a row on top, then sticks underneath, which, is the only logical way to form a pickaxe. This type of crafting and puzzle solving works because it falls onto something that was all but forgotten in games – the intelligence of the player.

source: Xombit Games

I have a collection of Super Nintendo games, which I consider to be the height of gaming history. That opinion was formed due to playing games as a child and then replaying them as an adult. In assembling the collection, I swore to myself very early on that I would play each cartridge as much as I could. I did this to ensure the games still worked and to also understand the system better. I would also refrain looking up about the game. If I was to play them, it would be without the help of the internet, just like it would have been while growing up. My approach led to moments of utter frustration (trying to use the special skills and moves in Batman Forever) and fantastic exploration (shooting accidental fireballs in Mortal Kombat) but the thing that was never questioned was my ability to progress, built out of desire, I pushed myself into the games devices and was rewarded by being able to play the game.

source: alphacoders

Games used to be taken on their own terms and merits. Donkey Kong Country was about saving a giant banana and using an array of jungle animals to do so. The original Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat arcade games did not have character bios built into the game for players – none of that was the focus. If it feels out of place to give advice or to try and add context, it’s because it probably is. None of the old games needed reason to have the player do what they did (looking at you, James Pond) but they presented common ideas, and then let the player go.

source: The Escapist

As I continue to play games, now on the Xbox and Playstation, I wonder about this time. The time when games handed us pieces and nothing more and if it is truly fading away, and if it is, what do I do? I am playing Darkest Dungeon at the moment which has the same incredible thought tucked into it – “What if I pour holy water onto an altar?”, I thought to myself late one night. I poured it and moments later I was texting a friend with complete thrill that it worked! These moments continued as these thoughts, now written here, wrote themselves in my head. How much of the player’s intelligence will you remove from the game, before you realise that the desire to learn and struggle until success, starved until the sensation of winning, will always be tied to human nature just as much as story telling or visual appeal?

Press X to pay respect to the player’s intelligence.

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Matthew Squaire
Matthew hosts the Matturday Podcasts with amazing people in video games. He can also be found on Twitter

 

 

 

 

Sonic Forces: Gameplay Footage Teaser

Just in case you missed it, at last week’s SXSW (South by Southwest) in Austin, SEGA revealed the first gameplay footage of the upcoming Sonic Forces game. We must admit, it is great to see Sonic back in force (Ed: sorry, it was there for the taking). The blue blur is smooth and as speedy as ever!

Sonic Forces, the latest in the Sonic the Hedgehog games series is being developed by the gun Sonic Team. The game is scheduled for release later this year on the Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC!


source: Five Star Games

 

Donkey Kong Advanced

Yep, you read that heading right – an advanced Windows version of the seminal Nintendo arcade classic, Donkey Kong. Take a bow on a job well done, Mr. Justin Bohemier!

When our very good friend Aaron Clement (from Press Play On Tape Podcast fame) gave us the heads up on this game, we thought we would do the same by sharing it with the rest of you. Before Ninty’s lawyers issue a cease and desist, make sure you grab your copy of Donkey Kong Advanced now!

So you may ask, what’s new in this version of Donkey Kong Advanced? Since you asked nicely, here you go:

  • Levels are different, some are completely new, while others have the same level structure with some differences
  • New switch, laser, and key system to save Pauline
  • Mario (Jumpman) can jump off high platforms and land without killing himself (yahoo!)
  • New heart bonus items are worth 2000 points but are tricky to get
  • Barrels rebound off the floor higher than before – so watch out
  • Hitting barrels with the hammer doesn’t pause the game during the explosion
  • Level 4 is icy – there is a special shoe item to pickup that makes it not slippery


source: Justin Bohemier

image source: Donkey Kong Advanced in itch.io

 

Junglist Returns With New Gaming Show

New Youth Network, SNACKABLETV.tv, has launched a brand-new video game show called UNDER CONTROL, with Jeremy Ray (Junglist) and Jessie James (Geek and Gamer Girl) hosting.

The show went live on SNACKABLETV.TV on January 26th 2017 and is broadcasting on the CATCH app on Sydney buses reaching a huge audience in the 13-to-30-year-old age bracket.

The two hosts are already prominent figures in the gaming industry, with Junglist being one of the co-creators of the (sorely missed) Good Game and Kotaku contributor, and Jessie being one of Australia’s most popular Twitch streamers with over 74,000 followers.

New content will be produced weekly. Under Control will feature snack-sized content on all things gaming; reviews, interviews, behind the scenes, news, features and on-site event coverage.

“Sometimes I go over to Jessie James’ house and we have conversations about games. Lately, there’s been this weird camera guy there, but she told me not to worry about it. I’m sure it’s nothing!”, says Junglist.

“Once we pried Junglist off Dark Souls III and cleaned him up, it became clear he was the best co-host I could imagine. We keep each other in check and hardly ever try to kill each other offline anymore. It’s great!”

SNACKABLETV is a revolutionary digital youth network housing the best in bite-sized content. It’s an entirely new way for young people all over the world to access high quality short-form entertainment for FREE, without annoying advertisements or subscriptions (Ed: Yay!). It’s mainstream-accessible without dumbing down the content or neglecting the core gaming audience.

“We’re excited to be creating something new and authentic for the gaming community.” – Deb Morgan, SnackableTV’s Under Control Producer.

You can view UNDER CONTROL now, so hop to it!

source: SNACKABLETV – Under Control

 

Price Evolution: is Nintendo Switch following the pricing trend from the past?

Article provided by Cuponation Australia. Prices quoted are in US Dollars

Cuponation Australia, a specialist in savings, delved into some market research to see how the prices of videogame consoles has changed through the last 30 years. The data includes prices from the launch of the first Nintendo video console in 1985 till their latest console release, the Nintendo Switch (March 2017). To see the evolution of prices, the research considered the inflation rate from the corresponding year of release.

Gaming has become cheaper by 24% (on average) over the last 30 years
The result shows that nowadays consumers are paying 24% less than 30 years ago. The price trend shows that each brand had lowered their prices since the launch of the first videogame console. It seems that Sega became 32% cheaper by their last console, Playstation cut their prices by 15%, Xbox and Nintendo by 25% and 29% respectively. The first videogame console produced by Nintendo, the NES, would cost $420USD nowadays which is already more than what you would pay for the Nintendo Switch. We obviously would not know the impact of inflation to the cost of the Nintendo Switch in future years.

Nintendo remains consistent in its pricing policy
The launch prices of Nintendo systems have remained relatively stable over the last 30+ years, with the exception being this year. The Nintendo Classic Mini from 2016 was not taken into consideration as it was not a next gen console. In relation to consoles from Xbox, PlayStation and Sega, consumers would notice some significant jumps in pricing over the decades – the launch of Sega’s Saturn in 1995, would cost $629.29USD in today’s money and the PlayStation 3, launched in 2007, would cost $578USD today.

The top 3 closest competitors in terms of price to Nintendo Switch ($299USD):
1) Xbox One S, launched in 2016 with inflation price of $299USD
2) Nintendo 64, launched in 2005 with inflated price of $298USD
3) Sega Dreamcast, launched in 1999 with inflated price of $288.11USD

source: Cuponation Australia

 

A Retro Gamer’s Stroll Through 80s Yakuza 0

Before we begin, let’s set the record straight – I have never played a Yakuza game! Yep, you read that right. You may throw out a “WTF?” at this point, and you’d be justified in asking exactly that – what the fudge, dude?

Well, I won’t bore you with why I haven’t played any of the previous Yakuza games (you can blame it all on those retro games I keep playing!), but at least you’ll get a perspective from a player experiencing the franchise for the very first time! I come into the Yakuza universe as a total noob, so go easy on me.

The vibrant lights of Pink Street!

So,”What’s this Yakuza 0 all about anyway?”, I ask myself. Well, first and foremost, I had heard that this prequel Yakuza action game, dubbed Zero, was set in the 80s, my favourite decade! That was enough to pique my interest in the game, so I thought I’d jump in the deep end and have a go!

Sobering up some drunkards, the old fashioned way!

Beating up peeps can work up a thirst

From a noob’s point of view, Yakuza 0 eases the player into the game with great cutscene sequences that set the narrative for the protagonist, Kazuma Kiryu, or simply just Kiryu. Obviously the title gives it away, Kiryu is a yakuza, a lowly debt collector for the Dojima Family (of the Tojo Clan). Kiryu is framed for murder and is then used as a pawn by a bent crime family lieutenant who aspires to be top dog. I’ll spare you the rest as I don’t want to spoil it for you!

Visiting the ‘family’!

No mobile phones in 1988, so pay phones were the best way to conduct business on the streets

I’ll be honest, I really wanted to play Yakuza 0 to roam the streets of 1988 Kamurocho, the notorious redlight district of Tokyo – to explore its karaoke bars, dart parlours and of course, its amusement centres – Club Sega and Hi-Tech Land were high on my list so I could play some (well, a lot of) Out Run! I really didn’t care for the story as to why I was setup for murder and the whole Empty Lot business.

Smoking can kill you! So can a bent lieutenant…

But before I could explore Kamurocho, I would have to dispense some good old fashioned beat-downs to street punks and hoodlums that were dumb enough to move in on my turf. Oh yeah, cash is earned the more peeps you beat up. These fight sections definitely reminded me of classic Dreamcast brawling action games, just like Shenmue. And just like Shenmue, it’s fun to explore the vibrant city you find yourself in.

Giving the vocal chords are work out with some karaoke

What I wasn’t counting on was the game’s ability to suck me into its story-line and its fascinating characters. I had to put the idea of exploration and playing Out Run to one side, as I set my sights on finding the people that framed me for murder and then confronting the bent Dojima lieutenant, Kuze. To say that I was now hooked on Yakuza 0 would be a gross understatement. With about 80 hours of gameplay, I have a way to go, and that is before I even touch any sidequests! So if you excuse me, I need to get back to being a yakuza and kick ten shades out of some really bad people.

Behold, the holy grail of arcades!

Damn, it’s closed. Can’t wait to play some Out Run!

image source: Yakuza 0